Friday, March 16, 2018

Facebook, Twitter & Other Stuff (that I do not use)

I have never had a Facebook or a Twitter account. I do not have a phone capable of sending a text message. I have observed others doing these things and decided that they are not for me. But the fact that I do not use them does not mean that I condemn you for using them. I hope that you will use good judgment in making use of these technologies. I trust that you will use them “in the name of the Lord” as a Christian should do everything (Col 3:17).

What does it mean to use Facebook, Twitter, and similar apps in the name of the Lord and to his glory?

First, it means not posting anything by means of such media that you would not present in person. Foul language and immodest attire should be no more acceptable for a Christian online than they are in real life. Repeating gossip is no more acceptable online than it is in person. If you do not know it to be fact, do not repeat it. If a fact will hurt rather than help, do not send it on to hurt others.

Second, use your electronic accounts to point people to the Lord. Post things on Facebook, Tweet things, send a text that will encourage spiritual examination and might even prompt someone to join with the Lord’s people in worship.

Some weeks ago a member posted some very uplifting comments about our Sunday morning worship on Facebook. Frankly, I think that should be happening most weeks. If a song touched your heart, if the sermon spoke to your needs (or to your temptations), why not Tweet it or text it to someone who should have been here? Why not mention it on Facebook?

If we are going to use these media, we ought to use them to the Lord’s glory (Col 3:17). Do your posts, tweets, and texts glorify him?

Friday, March 2, 2018

Humble Yourself

“The higher we are placed, the more humbly we should walk.”
I found that in an article on management by Oleg Vishnepolsky. The article was titled, “Humble yourself, or life will do it for you.” There were several such gems in the article. He cited a Brown University study as showing that the “Number 1 reason why smart managers fail is arrogance.” He said that a Duke University study found that humble managers get superior results. And he quoted Peter Drucker as saying, "Never promote people into leadership positions who believe they can do no wrong."

I trust that we already knew all of this. After all, the book we read and strive to obey contains many similar statements.

“You save a humble people, but your eyes are on the haughty to bring them down” (2 Samuel 22:28). “If my people who are called by my name humble themselves, and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and heal their land (2 Chronicles 7:14). “For you save a humble people, but the haughty eyes you bring down” (Psalm 18:27). “He leads the humble in what is right, and teaches the humble his way” (Psalm 25:9. “The LORD lifts up the humble; he casts the wicked to the ground (Psalm 147:6). “Toward the scorners he is scornful, but to the humble he gives favor” (Proverbs 3:34). “… this is the one to whom I will look: he who is humble and contrite in spirit and trembles at my word” (Isaiah 66:2). “But he gives more grace. Therefore it says, ‘God opposes the proud, but gives grace to the humble’” (James 4:6). “Humble yourselves before the Lord, and he will exalt you” (James 4:10, all from the ESV).

I have no idea how to pronounce “Oleg Vishnepolsky,” so I think we should learn humility because the Bible says so. It is easier to pronounce, as well as being a greater authority on the subject.